Tag Archives: Baseball Pitcher

Baseball Paintings Jim Bouton Knuckleball Atalanta Braves

Sports artist John Robertson'sBaseball Paintings. Jim Bouton is 5 feet by 8 feet, acrylic on unstretched canvas.

Baseball paintings. Jim Bouton pitcher for Atlanta Braved by Sports artist John Robertson is 5 feet by 8 feet, acrylic on unstretched canvas.

Baseball painting of Jim Bouton was a pitcher in the major leagues for a number of years playing for the New York Yankees, Seattle Pilots, Houston Astros and ended his career with the Atlanta Braves.  The longer he played in the Major Leagues he was able to extend his playing days developing the knuckleball.  As you see in the painting he is demonstrating how the knuckleball is held in the hand for throwing a pitch.

Jim Bouton who became a really good knucklball pitcher for the Atlanta Braves  wrote the classic baseball book, BALL FOUR.  The painting is  5 feet by 8 feet, acrylic on unstretched canvas.

One of things he is best known for is his memoir of his playing years with the New York Yankees, Seattle Pilots and the Houston Astros.  He had played in the 1962 World Series and was in the 1963 MLB All-Star game.

In Jim Bouton’s book “Ball Four” broke baseball’s code of silence where the athletes did not speak about what went on in the background of baseball.  The book is a memoir that described the petty jealousies on the team, as well as camaraderie, raucous tomcatting, game-winning heroics, routine drug use and the pain professional athletes endure.  One of Bouton’s important line in the book: “You spend your life gripping a baseball,” Jim Bouton wrote, “and it turns out that it was the other way around all along.”

Here is one of the the interesting stories from the book “Ball Four”

“I think the big deal was, I said Mickey Mantle had a home run with a hangover. And, you know, it was more of a story about what a great hitter he was, what a great player he was.

“We have been out the night before, having a few drinks, and Mickey came to the clubhouse the next day, and he was a little hung over. So, you know, Ralph Houk said, ‘Don’t worry about it. Sleep it off in the trainer’s room. We’ll put somebody else in center field.’ Anyway, the game goes extra innings. We need a pinch-hitter in the 10th. Somebody went to wake up the Mick. He comes out, put a bat in his hands. He walks up to home plate, takes one practice swing and hits the first pitch into the left field bleachers, a tremendous blast.

“Guys are going nuts. He comes over, crosses home plate. Actually, he missed home plate. We have to send him back for that. He comes over to the dugout, and he looks up in the stands, and he says, those people don’t know how tough that really was. Then after the game, the sportswriter said, ‘Mick, how did you that?’ … And he said, ‘Well, it was very simple. I hit the middle ball.’ ”

 

Baseball painting Pitcher Sandy Koufax LA Dodgers Sports Art

Sandy Koufax “the Left Arm of God”

Painting image of Los Angeles Dodgers Sandy Koufax on the pitcher's mound showing his great follow through after he has thrown the pitch.

A client had seen an earlier version of this Sandy Koufax painting that is on this blog and wanted one for his father. This one is painted with acrylic inks on drafting film. The other Sandy Koufax painting was painted in oil. The overall size is 11″ x 14″

Sandy Koufax is considered one of the greatest pitchers ever to play the game.  His nickname was “The Left Arm of God”  He played his entire career with the Brooklyn and LA Dodgers retiring in 1966  because of arthritis in his left elbow at age 30.

One of the things Sandy Koufax is remembered for was his decision not to pitch Game 1 of the 1965 World Series because it fell on Yom Kippur.  It was a conflict between professional pressures and personal beliefs.  Koufax was inducted into the MLB Hall of Fame in 1972 – the youngest ever inducted at the time at 36 years old.

Story about Sandy Koufax

Here is one of the great stories about Koufax that I found on Wired “Cruel Curveball Science; Nasty Koufax” BY DAVID DOBBS

“Koufax had to face the terrifying Mickey Mantle. The book on Mantle, Leavy explains, was never ever ever EVER throw him the curve. For he was so strong in his upper body and arms that even if you fooled him badly and got him to commit his hips too early, he could still crush the ball as long as his hands were still back. So don’t throw him the hook. Just don’t. And if you can throw 100 mph, like Koufax could, why throw the curve?

Because you’re Koufax.

So in the first game in which they meet — Game 1 of the 1963 World Series, Dodgers v Yankees — Koufax faces Mantle three times. On the first at-bat he strikes out Mantle throwing nothing but fastballs.

Mantle’s second time up, Koufax gets two strikes on him. Everyone in the park is thinking heat. But Koufax shakes off the fastball sign once, twice. Catcher catches on, puts down two fingers to call for the curve. And Koufax’s curve was a horrid thing to a batter, possibly the best curveball ever, a nose-to-toes diver that just killed batters, flummoxed them utterly, destroyed their minds.  Yet still, he’d been told NOT to throw this thing to Mantle. So he decdies he’s going to. And he does.

Ball comes in eye-high, just buzzing … and just before reaching the plate it dives, crossing the plate at Mantle’s knees. Mantle flinches, just the tiniest bit,  but never moves the bat. Ump calls strike three. Mantle stands there an extra beat, then turns to the catcher and says, “How the fuck is anybody supposed to hit that shit?” And walks back to the dugout.”

Most of the paintings shown on the blog have been sold.  (They sell fast)  But there are a few available.  If you click on the link for Paintings for Sale you can see what is available.  What I suggest is that you contact me for your specific need and I can easily paint something specific for you.  Just clink on the contact page for information.

Baseball Painting of Curt Schilling Pitcher for Boston Red Sox

Curt Schilling Boston Red Sox Baseball painting

The painting of Curt Schilling Pitcher for the Boston Red Sox is 50” x 70” acrylic on unstretched canvas.”

The great pitcher Curt Schilling who finished his Major League Baseball career at the Boston Red Sox was aright-handed pitcher who helped lead the Philadelphia Phillies to the World Series in 1993 and won World Series championships in 2001 with the Arizona Diamondbacks and in 2004 and 2007 with the Boston Red Sox. Schilling retired with a career postseason record of 11–2. His .846 postseason winning percentage is a major-league record among pitchers with at least 10 decisions.

As a great pitcher the question always arises on how one becomes great.  He said, “In my mind, I never doubted whether I was going to achieve what I wanted to do. I just had to decide what it is I wanted to do.”   Those words are true for most of us as I know I have spent a good deal of time trying to decide what I wanted to do with my life.  After working for twenty years I finally committed myself to painting.  Just making that decision changed my life for the best.  And then Curt says more about success, “I think I’ve earned a certain level of respect, based on my accomplishments and my consistency.”   And that comes with long, hard work.  And in that work one runs into problems.  As Curt says,  “I’ve made mistakes, … I am sure I will again sometime, but that happens, that’s part of being human…”

With all of that being said – In the current news Curt announced he had been diagnosed with squamous cell  carcinoma — cancer in the mouth. Schilling blames his use of chewing tobacco as a player.

According to Steve Silva of the Boston Globe, Curt Schilling said, “I did (chewing tobacco) for about 30 years. It was an addictive habit. I can think of so many times in my life when it was so relaxing to just sit back and have a dip and do whatever, and I lost my sense of smell, my taste buds for the most part. I had gum issues, they bled, all this other stuff. None of it was enough to ever make me quit. The pain that I was in going through this treatment, the second or third day it was the only thing in my life that had that I wish I could go back and never have dipped. Not once. It was so painful.”

Philip Humber Pitcher Chicago White Sox Throws No-Hitter

Phil Humber Chicago white Soxs

Phil Humber Chicago White Soxs

This is a small sports baseball painting of Philip Humber who threw a no-hitter  The no-hitter was thrown against the Seattle Mariners on April 21, 2012. Humber recorded a perfect game.
There have been 251 official major league no-hitters, including two in the postseason.

Here are a couple of quotes he said about the no-hitter at the time.  “I had never seen a perfect game or no-hitter thrown.” ‘It’s nice to pitch to hitters and have defense behind you. My arm has been 100% for a month or a month and a half.”

The baseball art is a 14” x 17” oil painting on drafting film. The actual baseball player image on the drafting film is about 10” x 14”. What is can of amusing about this painting is that I mispelled Chicago on the jersey.  I thought about changing it but liked the way it came out.